Submitted by admin
on: Monday, July 22, 2013 - 11:10

A Path to Dignity to screen in Bolivia

A Path to Dignity continues to make its way around the world this month. Tomorrow, Tuesday, 23 July, the film will be screened in Sucre, Bolivia as part of the Festival Internacional de Cine de los Derechos Humanos “El septimo ojo es tuyo” (FESTIMO). FESTIMO is organized by PUKAÑAWI, an organisation that encourages the management and development of culture and human rights through film.

Path to Dignity screening in BoliviaThe Festival’s 2013 theme, “work as a source of dignity and life”, certainly resonates with the voices featured in A Path to Dignity. Premalatha, a young girl in India, imagines herself becoming a teacher, working to sustain the kind of education that has changed the way she understands the world. Evrim, in Turkey, expresses her wish to work with and be an example for other women who seek to change their lives. For the Victoria police, human rights education encourages a more open and accommodating workplace, and new, more sensitive approaches to working with people in their community. These three stories exemplify the ways that work—supporting oneself, working for change, encouraging others—can be a wellspring of independence and dignity for children and adults worldwide.

A Path to Dignity will be screened alongside more than 70 films of varying lengths during the week-long festival in Sucre. The festival also features workshops, discussions and concerts aimed toward increasing cross-cultural dialogues concerning human rights and the importance of film in human rights education. More extensive information about the festival can be found here and on FESTIMO’s website.

If you are interested in sharing A Path to Dignity in your community, please contact us to arrange a screening in your area.

- Mary Kate Long

Mary Kate Long is an intern for HREA. As a graduate student at Boston University, she studies Buddhism, ethics and civic life in Asia.

Submitted by admin
on: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 15:56

Path to Dignity screenings held in Australia, Canada, USA

Path to Dignity screening in SydneyOver the past few months, we have been very pleased to bring A Path to Dignity to audiences across the globe. Here is a snapshot of our activities:

- We were honoured that the film was selected to be shown at the March 21st Human Rights Film Festival in Winnipeg.

- HREA co-organised a lunch screening and discussion of the film at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

- The Australian Human Rights Commission organised a screening and panel discussion including Mmaskepe Sejoe, whose work with the Victoria Police is featured in the film. More than 100 people attended.

- Just last week, HREA’s Kathryn Vandever spoke at a screening of A Path to Dignity at the monthly meeting of Amnesty International Local Group 15 in Concord, Massachusetts, and SGI Canada’s community centre in Calgary organised two screenings at their Open House.

Since its launch last September, A Path to Dignity has been screened at three human rights film festivals and at numerous conferences and trainings around the world.

We will continue to bring the film to more audiences and communities in the coming months. Please contact us if you are interested in organising a screening in your area.

Thank you to all of our partners for making these events possible!

(Image courtesy of Annie Pettitt/Australian Human Rights Commission)

Submitted by admin
on: Thursday, December 20, 2012 - 08:53

Webcast of 'A Path to Dignity' at UN in New York

The documentary film A Path to Dignity was screened and webcast live from the United Nations headquarters in New York on 12 December as part of the Human Rights Day 2012 celebrations.

The screening of the film at the United Nations in New York was followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Ellen Bruno, Ambassador Saul Weisleder (Deputy Permanent Representative of Costa Rica to the United Nations), Maarit Kohonen Sheriff (Deputy Head, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, New York), Hiro Sakurai (Director, UN Liaison Office in New York, Soka Gakkai International). The panel was moderated by HREA's Director Frank Elbers.

Video clip View recording

 

 

Submitted by admin
on: Saturday, December 8, 2012 - 07:10

Screening of 'A Path to Dignity' at UN in New York

Human Rights Day 2012: My Voice CountsThe documentary film A Path to Dignity will be screened at the United Nations headquarters in New York on 12 December as part of the Human Rights Day 2012 celebrations. A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education is a 28-minute movie that presents three stories illustrating the impact of human rights education respectively on school children (India), law enforcement agencies (Australia) and women victims of violence (Turkey). The film was launched at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva last September.

A key message of A Path to Dignity is that “one person can make a difference” in solving problems in society. Human rights education can transform people’s lives, empowering individuals on a path to dignity and bring about positive change in their respective communities and societies. In this sense, human rights education plays a fundamental role in ensuring equality and equal opportunities, combating discrimination and preventing human rights violations.

The screening of the film at the United Nations in New York will be followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Ellen Bruno, Ambassador Saul Weisleder (Costa Rica), Maarit Kohonen Sheriff (OHCHR) and Hiro Sakurai (SGI). The panel will be moderated by HREA's Director Frank Elbers.

The cover of "A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education" © OHCHR Photo/Christine WambaaWHEN: Wednesday, December 12 from 1:15 - 2:30 pm
WHERE: NLB Conference Room 7, United Nations Headquarters, New York*
ORGANISERS: Human Rights Education Associates (HREA), Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and Soka Gakkai International (SGI)
CO-SPONSOR: Permanent Mission of Costa Rica to the United Nations

* For this event it is not required to have a UN Ground Pass. However, it is required to RSVP in order to get a Guest Pass to access the UN grounds.

RSVP on HREA's Facebook page | Flyer PDF

 

 

 

 

Submitted by admin
on: Saturday, December 8, 2012 - 06:55

The impact of human rights education on community policing

David Jada - youth worker in Melbourne originally from Sudan David Jada is a Sudanese youth leader in Melbourne, Australia. Relations with the Victoria Police are sometimes tense. Members of the police have been accused of "overpolicing" Sudanese youth, and young people in David's community, many of them recent immigrants, are hesitant about turning to the police to resolve disputes. How can human rights education help improve relations between the police and the community?

David has become involved in a youth leadership training run through the Victoria Police's Human Rights Project, established in 2006 after the passage of a new human rights law, the Victorian Charter on Human Rights and Responsibilities. Through the Project, all 14,000 Victoria Police employees receive training on human rights in the context of policing. They focus on areas such as improving relationships with the community, respecting suspects' rights, and articulating values of respect and dignity. Evidence suggests that these efforts are having an impact: complaints about police behaviour have decreased by 30%.

Victoria Police community policing"Wherever somebody has done human rights education there is less angst when they are dealing with the community," explains Mmaskepe Sejoe, Human Rights Unit Manager for the Victoria Police. David agrees that human rights education has made a difference. He no longer sees police officers as just a uniform. When officers step out of uniform and work with the community, they become "just a normal person like you and me."

To find out more about the impact of human rights education and training on the Victoria Police, view this segment this segment of A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education or watch the entire film at www.path-to-dignity.org to learn more.

 

Submitted by admin
on: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 - 02:05

'A Path to Dignity' screened at Council of Europe

Panel discussion following screening of 'A Path to Dignity' at Council of Europe (from left to right): Kazunari Fujii (SGI), Felisa Tibbitts (HREA) and Elena Ippoliti (OHCHR) (Photo courtesy of Council of Europe)A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education was screened at the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, France on 29 November. Almost fifty people attended the screening, which was followed by a panel discussion. The screening and panel discussion were organised in the framework of the conference "Human Rights and Democracy in Action - Looking Ahead: The impact of the Council of Europe Charter on Education for Democratic Citizenship and Human Rights Education", which brought together 200 government representatives, international institutions, civil society organisations and education professionals in Strasbourg on 29 and 30 November 2012, and was organised by the Council of Europe in co-operation with the European Commission and the European Wergeland Centre.

Submitted by admin
on: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 - 04:55

Premalatha's story

Premalatha - A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education"I have been denied my rights. But these rights are my birthright," says Premalatha, a school child in a village near Madurai in the Tamil Nadu region of southern India. She encounters caste and gender-based discrimination. When she fetches water from a well, she and children from other "lower caste" or "Dalit" families are supposed to wait behind children from the "upper caste". In school, Dalits are sometimes not allowed to eat with other children. In teashops, they may be served tea in coconut shells, while members of the upper caste drink from steel cups. At home, Premalatha, not her brothers, is expected to do all the chores. Until the introduction of human rights education in her school, teachers sometimes hit students with sticks.

From her human rights teacher, she learns about the rights guaranteed by the Indian Constitution, the rights of the child, and the principles of non-discrimination and equality. Premalatha and her classmates know they can use the human rights framework to work with their teachers, families and community to change attitudes and help resolve and prevent human rights violations.

What do Premalatha and her friends do? View this segment of A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education or watch the entire film at www.path-to-dignity.org to learn more.

 

Submitted by admin
on: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 20:33

'A Path to Dignity' to be screened at Papua New Guinea Human Rights Film Festival

Papua New Guinea Human Rights Film Festival'A Path to Dignity' will be screened at Papua New Guinea Human Rights Film Festival. The PNG Human Rights Film Festival promotes greater respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights for all. This year’s festival takes place in three stages, in three different parts of Papua New Guinea:

  • 14-18 November, Port Moresby
  • 24-26 November, Buka
  • 30 November – 1 December, Goroka

 

 

 

 

Submitted by admin
on: Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 12:55

A Path to Dignity featured by The Communication Initiative

A Path to Dignity was highlighted by The Communication Initiative, an extensive global network of people engaged in media and communication for development, at: http://www.comminit.com/global/content/path-dignity-power-human-rights-education.

 

Submitted by admin
on: Monday, October 15, 2012 - 14:54

'A Path to Dignity' screened at Europe's largest human rights conference

Screening of 'A Path to Dignity' at OSCE conference in Warsaw HREA organised a showing of the new documentary film "A Path to Dignity: The Power of Human Rights Education" at the annual Human Dimension Implementation Meeting (HDIM) in Warsaw organised by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). Approximately fifty people attended the screening, held on the evening of September 24th.

HDIM is Europe's largest conference on human rights and democracy, attended by government representatives, experts, non-governmental organisations, and human rights defenders from 56 countries. Read full article.

 

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